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Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin, Forgiveness, Relationship, Love and Growth – Part 4

28 Mar

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Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin, Forgiveness, Relationship, Love and Growth – Part 4  

Reflections on Christian Living is in part knowing that we have all sinned, we have fallen short of God’s standard of holiness.  This fact is true of ALL of humanity.  No one is exempt from failing to please God in our own efforts.   (Isaiah  64:6)  God is very clear that in our human efforts — without Christ – we can do nothing to measure up to His Holy expectations.  The Bible makes this profusely clear in an abundance of passages.  For us – this is NOT where the story needs to end.  We have a choice to make.

This Lent season, I challenged myself  to walk in faith again through a section of scripture which helped me to find God.  I wanted to reread and restudy these verses now to expand my spirituality, to grow, to extend my borders and to go outside my comfort zone by digging deeper.

I offer all of you the same opportunity – take a journey along a well paved and ancient Roman Road.  In the book of Romans, Paul tells people to realize that in this world there is some bad news – yet in the midst of bad news there is good news waiting to breakthrough into our lives.

By good news I mean God has always loved us, and continues to love us at our very darkest moments.   His word says, “That while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”   Jesus Christ did this knowing that not everyone would accept the gift He made in offering His life.  I honestly don’t believe any other human being could do that in total unconditional love.  Only Jesus walked in history as fully God and fully man.  Only He could make a way for us to be reconciled to God.

I am in awe, just think about this for a few moments:  Jesus Christ made a way for our reconciliation to God.  His resurrection brings us the possibility of new life in Christ.  Jesus died, but he did not stay dead.  He – as God – has the power over death.  This is the miraculous truth of Jesus Christ’s resurrection.  The suffering which came with that death and the willingness of God to make such a way is part of the reflections for me during this Lenten Season.

For anyone not familiar with a set of passages known as the Roman Road, they are listed below.  Let’s each read and ponder these deep truths in our hearts as we move forward toward the Easter season of joyful resurrection. All of these passages are found in the Holy Bible, in the book of Romans.

Romans 3:10-12

Romans 3:23

Romans 6:23

Romans 5:6, 8-11

Romans 10:9-10

Romans 10:13

Romans 5:1

Romans 8:1

Romans 8:38-39  This is great news and a wonderful promise.

If you want to go deeper:  Follow-up with these verses for dessert to ponder the questions — What now?  How shall I live?

2 Cor 5:17, Romans 12: 1-3, and Colossians 3:2

GraceBridge

Please leave a comment if you want more information or have questions.  Thank you for reading.

Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin, Forgivenss, Relationship, Love – Part 2

26 Mar

1Timothy2_3-4

Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin, Forgivenss, Relationship, Love and Growth – Part 2

Sin – not a popular word these days.  I know I would much rather acknowledge only the attributes of God being loving, kind, gentle.  I think others are similar.  It is easier on our ego and self-esteem to make God a God who is not righteous, not holy.  An easier God is just a slightly higher version of us – holy, without sin Himself, but not judgmental or righteous enough to hold people accountable and require a payment for the penalty of sin.   Somehow in our human reasoning to have a God that requires payment for sin, is to make Him petty.  That is NOT WHO GOD IS.  God is OTHR.  He is beyond anything.   In the books of Isaiah as well as Job, God Himself points out the vast differences between man and God.  He asks “Where you there when I hung the stars?”   God says “Your thoughts are not my thoughts, nor your ways my ways.”

Instead of a petty God, as some would have Him to be – quite the opposite is true.  A God that does not require a penalty for sin is not holy, is not righteous.  In fact, to make Him so, is to put ourselves above God.  Here is one reason why:  even as humans, our justice system and our sense of justice, both require people to fulfill a sentence for wrongdoing, for harming others, or even for attempting self-harm.  Suicide is illegal in most states, so even harming ourselves, according to man’s law, requires retribution.  Requires actions to save.  EMT’s called to the sight of an attempted suicide must make an effort to save the person and return them to a functioning human state.  Even humans recognize the delusion that man is in control of our own soul.  We are only in control of our choices.  And we do not often choose wisely; even when we do, it is like a reach of inches, when God demands a standard of holiness that is the length of thousands of feet.  We can never reach far enough – without God’s intervention on our behalf.  God determined that our short fallings, our sin, deserve death.  It is holy and right that He has done so.

YET IN His goodness, kindness, mercy and grace – instead of insisting we pay the penalty — before the beginning of time – GOD in His majesty and love – also determined a way for His son, Jesus, to take our penalty, to  pay the ransom price for us.   Read I Timothy 2, verses 4-6.  Or if you desire, read the entire chapter.

God does not just want us to confess our sin to Him, He doesn’t want the “box checked” and for us to then walk away and live as we choose.   God has reached out since day one to have relationship, reconciliation, and fellowship with mankind.  God seeks us, He desires us to seek Him.  He promises in Jeremiah 29: 11-14 that when we seek Him with a sincere heart, we will find Him.

In many Psalms, but especially in Psalm 51, David rightly acknowledges that at the root of all failings,  all sin is truly sin  against a Holy God.   Do we harm each other?  Most definitely.  Do we harm ourselves?  Yes.  We have only to see the example put forth in first and second Samuel to see lots of evidence.  And it continues throughout time including today.  Watch the news to see how many times people’s choices are not beneficial to themselves or others.  The reality is that sin breaks our fellowship, puts a space in our relationship with a Holy God.  He cannot meet with us when we harbor sin in our hearts.  Sin also breaks our relationships with each other.

Through Nathan the prophet, God offered David forgiveness if he would repent.  God is always reaching out to us to offer reconciliation.  It is we who are to respond.  Psalm 51 says “Against you, and you only have I sinned and done what is evil in your sight”.  NOTE:  It is hugely important to read hrough the entire Psalm and to read the the context t background of what happened in David’s life leading up to this confession.  ((2 Samuel, chapters 11 & 12).   David was a lier, cheater, adulterer, murderer, and possible rapist.  Yet, when he confessed his sin, as we learned yesterday – God forgave him his sin.  (I John 1:9)   Was there an earthly consequence?  Yes, the child died.  Clearly many others were hurt.  Was there reconciliation to a Holy God after admitting wrong doing? Most definitely – Yes.

For me,  loving is forgiveness.   Being loving – toward both others and myself –  means owning and admitting my failures.   Not to live there, but to say I did it or thought it or said it, to tell God and the person(s) that I’m sorry and I want to move on in forgiveness and reconciliation.   A few weeks ago, I read something that really resonated with me.   I do not know who said it first, or to whom to attribute the quote.

Here is what it said:  “I would rather be an honest sinner, than a holy hypocrite.”   It makes a valid point – though the saying is clearly an oxymoron – for there is certainly no such person as a holy hypocrite.   To be a hypocrite is to pose. To be out of alignment between our private self, our heart, and our public self.  Most importantly, to be a hypocrite is to be out of alignment with God.  To say one thing and do another.  To say one thing and think another.  The list goes on……

We can sometimes fool people, but never God.  God looks on our heart.  He knows our every thought and motives.  Some people say that they do not attend church because it is filled with hypocrites.   Again, in reality, it is the opposite.  Church is filled with people who openly admit we are sinners, people who acknowledge we blow it.  Often. For you see, every week I attend church, every time I open my Bible to read and learn and listen to God, I am living and declaring the fact I am NOT a hypocrite.  I am acknowledging I cannot live a holy life apart from God.  I cannot live without confession.  I cannot live without asking forgiveness in all my relationships.  I cannot live without knowing that a loving God paid the ultimate price to reconcile and have a relationship with me. (Cross reference John 3:16)

I need that unending, unconditional Love.  I need that perspective.  I need that HOPE.  Knowing God is always there with me and on my side is my daily dose of reality.  Reality check – as in real eternity – not our temporary world now.   Most of the folks I know that want a close relationship with God feel the same way.  We need God.  Not the other way around.

If you want more information or have questions, leave a comment.   I look forward to your comments.  Thank you for reading.

Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin, Forgivenss, Relationship, Love and Growth – Part 1

25 Mar

1-john-1-9_Cartoon

Reflections on Christian Living – Lent 2015 Thoughts on Sin – Part 1

Have you ever felt while everyone else is “springing forward” you are sliding back”?  This lent season is unusual for me.  My reflections have taken a turn.  I am in the midst of a struggle to “feel” close to Christ.  I feel distant.  I know who moved.  Me, not God.

I know that when I confess my sins, God is faithful and just to forgive my failings. (I John 1:9)  If you don’t know, the definition of “confessing” is to agree  with one’s accuser.  In the legal sense, it is confession that gains one a plea bargain and a lighter sentence.  In our God relationship, it is confession that agrees with God, and the result is possible earthly consequences or fall out, but no eternal punishment.  It is confessed, it is forgiven.

To tell God that I am aware of my short-fallings, my sins; Yes – that is confession.  Knowing and doing so are two different things.  Sometimes I just want to hang on a little longer to my rebellion, my way, my heart, my vision. Sometimes, I want to make a turn that is not in the road.  I want to refuse to go where I believe God is calling me, to do as I believe He wants.  I am sure I’m not alone in this.  My usual reason why?  Well, it’s silly really, but fear.  Fear of failure.  In this, I can identify with Moses.  “But Lord, I’m not qualified.” “Surely you don’t mean me.” “But that is so far beyond my comfort zone…..”Sin means turning my back on God and His desires and commandments.   Not a good option for any relationship.

If we seek to have ongoing daily relationship with the God of the Universe it means following His directions.  Obedience is a critical aspect of our Christian walk. Some Christian denominations have a prayer, which in part says: “I confess that I have sinned against You (meaning God), in thought, word, and deed, by what I have done, and by what I have left undone.”  I like that.  I need that, for in truth, I am much more apt to entertain an ungodly thought of NOT doing, rather than to act out by miss-doing.

I am very aware of that truth.  I am much more apt to leave something unattended than to commit a “visible offense”.  That doesn’t mean it is not wrong (sin).   Many are those of every faith that claim it of primary import – yet do not do what is called for action in obedient followers.  Each of us want to deny claim our short-fallings – because – well, “everybody does that”; or the classic “It’s not like I killed anyone” … “It is so drastic, people will think me a fool or worse, a wierdo”.

In case you are wondering — NO those are not acceptable excuses in God’s eyes.  I don’t know about you, but somehow I want to believe that partial commitment and partial obedience and partial following is OK.  It is not.  It is NOT what Jesus called His disciples to be.  In John 15 Jesus calls His disciples friends.  Each of those friends (except 2) died a cruel death for that friendship.  Yet I ponder in my weakness the harm of being unrepentant for a day or so.  I think Jesus friends who walked daily with Him during his earthly ministry had several things right.

I you have any questions or comments please feel free to leave them below.  Thanks for reading.  Part 2 soon.

Please leave a comment if you want more information or have questions.  Thank you for reading.

Martha L Shaw - Poet, Writer, Artist

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